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Michael Aaron Rockland: Thank you, guys.

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‘Navy Crazy,’ by Michael Aaron Rockland.

Most Navy men go to sea and many to war. Michael Aaron Rockland found himself ashore as a medic, tending to American sailor and marine mental patients in a locked psychiatric ward at a U.S. hospital in Japan where, though it was peacetime, he saw considerable combat. His memoir is a very different kind of war story, interesting for its look at the backwardness of military medicine in those days, especially in the treatment of gays, who were regarded not only as sick but as criminals. The book explores the efforts of the Navy to constantly cover its tracks and to live by the code that there is the right way, the wrong way, and the Navy way. Despite the book's serious concerns, it is also hilariously funny and a super-read. --Angus Kress Gillespie, Maritime Historian
Rockland's book is a combination and . On the surface, it is about the Navy, but it is really about a young man's coming of age in the 1950s at a time when America was caught between World War II and the turbulent 1960s. He does it as a medical corpsman in a psychiatric ward with one guy who eats razor blades for lunch and two men who think they are Jesus. It is an eye opening and very funny look at both post-war America and post-war Japan, an emotional tour de force. --Bruce Chadwick, author of James and Dolley Madison
Rockland beautifully captures the timeless absurdity of military life: the humor, the confusion, and the sadness. The stories are poignant and compelling, and Rockland's recollections are a testament to how little has changed in the military in the last fifty years. --Sergeant Matthew Lane. U.S. Army (Ret.)

Rockland's book is a combination and . On the surface, it is about the Navy, but it is really about a young man's coming of age in the 1950s at a time when America was caught between World War II and the turbulent 1960s. He does it as a medical corpsman in a psychiatric ward with one guy who eats razor blades for lunch and two men who think they are Jesus. It is an eye opening and very funny look at both post-war America and post-war Japan, an emotional tour de force. --Bruce Chadwick, author of James and Dolley Madison

Rockland beautifully captures the timeless absurdity of military life: the humor, the confusion, and the sadness. The stories are poignant and compelling, and Rockland's recollections are a testament to how little has changed in the military in the last fifty years. --Sergeant Matthew Lane. U.S. Army (Ret.)

Michael Aaron Rockland is professor of American studies at Rutgers University. His two years as a naval medical corpsman inspired this memoir.
Five of his books have won prizes or received similar recognition, including New York Times Notable Book of the Year and Washington Post's Fifty Best Books of the Year. A book he co-wrote, Looking for America on the New Jersey Turnpike, was chosen by the New Jersey State Library as one of the Ten Best Books Ever Written on New Jersey or by a New Jerseyan. Two other books received the prize of the New Jersey Studies Alliance.

Angus K. Gillespie, Michael Aaron Rockland, Ruth Strohl-Palmer

Some of Michael Aaron Rockland’s books.

Author and American Studies professor Michael Aaron Rockland talks about how his son got a role in the film Doctor Zhivago from his book AN AMERICAN DIPLOMAT IN FRANCO SPAIN (Hansen Publishing Group, October 1, 2012).

Rutgers American Studies professor and author Michael Aaron Rockland has completed his 13th and 14th books, "Navy Crazy" and "An American Diplomat In Franco Spain," memoirs about his experiences as a medic in a locked U.S. Naval psychiatric ward in Japan and as a diplomat in Spain.